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Posts Tagged ‘temptation of Jesus’

As we find our way into an uncertain future individually and together as congregations, as communities, and as a nation,  seemingly easier but dubious, devilish ways will suggest themselves as means to the ends we hope for.  Like our ancestors in the wilderness and like our Christian forebears who sought the power of the state for Christian ends, or who put protecting themselves first, we are vulnerable to making deals with the devil, and we find ourselves worshiping something other than the living God.

Making Deals with the Devil

A Sermon on Matthew 4:1-11 and Exodus 32:1-14

Believe it or not, the deals the devil offered Jesus truly were tempting.  Why?  Because the devil’s proposals all appeared to offer sure-fire ways to accomplish an awful lot of good.  Imagine all the good Jesus could accomplish if the powers of the world were concentrated in his hands.

These deals were all the more tempting because Jesus was vulnerable.  Here Jesus was, about thirty years old, already well into middle age for that era, and he still wasn’t launched on his mission.  He had already been waiting such a long time and now the Spirit of God had taken him into the wilderness to wait some more.  Forty days and forty nights was a long time!  It was a time of great uncertainty.  Jesus didn’t know what the way forward was.  Jesus did not arrive on this earth with detailed plans, agendas, and timetables for ministry, and none was handed to him later.  That meant Jesus had to discern what to do and discern when the time was right.

What’s more, this extended time in the wilderness had left Jesus worn down and hungry.  Who could blame him if he just wanted to get some decisions made already.  Let’s get on with this!

A voice came to Jesus, a voice that sounded so reasonable. It wasn’t obviously the voice of evil.   It seemed to speak sense.  “Since you are the Son of God,” it said, “Turn these stones into bread and eat.  Look!  There’s an unlimited supply!  Just think of how many other hungry people you could feed.”  If Jesus wanted to attract lots of people to himself, that would certainly do it.  Jesus could literally have people eating out of his hand.

“Or what about this,” the voice of the devil continued.  “Come with me to the top of the Temple in Jerusalem.  Since you are God’s Son, throw yourself down, proving that what the Bible says is true: that God will order his angels to hold you up so you won’t even hurt your feet on the rocks.  Psalm 91:11-12, quote!  Not to mention the people, no religious leader will be able to object.  They’ll be forced to accept that you are who you are.”  The crowds will swell even more.

Then that voice beckoned Jesus even higher, to the top of a very high mountain.  “Look,” it said.  “Spread out before us are all the kingdoms of the world.  See how splendid they are.  My power is what makes them great.  Kingdoms run on my kind of power.  This power is what the world understands.  Worship me, and this power will be yours.  Make a deal with me and take charge!  Deal or no deal?”

When people are stressed and uncertain, they are vulnerable to voices that say, “I have the answer.”  They are vulnerable to making deals with the devil.  They are like the God’s people the Israelites in the wilderness, tired of all the struggle and uncertainty and waiting, anxious to get moving forward.  

“Aaron,” they exclaimed, “We don’t know what on earth has happened to this man Moses who led us out of Egypt.  We’re tired of waiting.  We’re tired of this wilderness.  Let’s get this show on the road.  Make us gods to lead us on to the Promised Land.  Make something we can see and rally behind.”

They didn’t get any argument from Aaron.  He, too, must have been anxious to get going.  So Aaron told all the people to turn in their gold jewelry, which he proceeded to melt down, pour into a mold, and shape into a golden calf, a bull.  Why a bull?  In the ancient Near East the bull was a common symbol for power, and in particular, for military power.  This is what the gods of the great nations around Israel looked like.  Actually, Wall Street power is still pictured as a bull. 

When the people saw the bull, they agreed, “Look, Israel, these are our gods that led us out of Egypt, and THIS is the power that is going to get us to the promised land!”
What an irony!  While Aaron and the Israelites were busy concocting this golden calf, imitating the world around them, settling for the gods of the world, God had something much better in mind.  God was busy describing to Moses plans for using that very same gold to make beautiful vessels, instruments, and furnishings for God’s moveable sanctuary and for the ark of the covenant, the golden box to hold the tablets of God’s covenant law.  This sign of the covenant was what God wanted at the head of the procession to the promised land, not some bull.  The result was disaster.

Through the centuries the people of Christ have certainly made deals with the devil, sometimes for selfish ends, but often in the name of  some hoped-for GOOD goal, aiming for the promised land.  For example, this week I studied some of the history of the church in Germany during the Nazi era before and during the second world war.  History shows why the church didn’t take a stronger stand against what Hitler and his henchmen were doing.  In 1933, for example, the pope signed an agreement with the Nazi government, before the worst of the atrocities got started, with the goal of making sure the church could keep on doing what the church does, or what they believed it should do.   Honorable goal, right?  Hitler’s government agreed to permit Catholics to observe the sacraments and make pastoral appointments without interference, it agreed to state support of Catholic schools, and it agreed to permit religious instruction in public schools.  This looked like a win for the church, especially given some of the earlier history of persecution against Catholics in the region.  In exchange, however, the clergy could not engage in political activity or hold political office, they had to swear an oath of loyalty to the Hitler’s Third Reich, and they agreed to sponsor only organizations that strictly did charitable works or social activities.  The pope’s purpose in signing that agreement was to protect the institutional church.

But this muzzled the church’s tradition of speaking out on matters of human rights and justice.  The church was strangely silent, at least publicly, when Hitler started purging and murdering his political opponents, and when the government instituted boycotts of Jewish businesses, and started destroying synagogues and imprisoning Jews.  Eventually some found ways to resist, especially when it became clear that the Nazis’ goal was to eliminate everybody deemed weak or undesirable.  Some paid the price for resisting—imprisonment and worse.

Protestants made their own deals, going along with a policy of coordinating Nazi beliefs and policies with church theology and practice, beliefs about homeland and patriotism, and racial purity.  There was a Protestant movement called Deutsche Kristen, German Christians, who did things such as teach that Jesus was not Jewish, and bar Christians of Jewish background from being leaders.  There were many who thought Hitler was sent by God to save the German people and nation economically, culturally, and spiritually.  Cooperating with Nazism appeared to them to be the way to promote patriotism and traditional family values.

Other Christians who disagreed with the German Christian moment founded their own movement called the Confessing Church.  One of its documents, the Barmen Declaration of 1934, is in our Presbyterian Church USA Book of Confessions.  It declares that Christ alone is Lord of the church.  But even the Confessing Church had a spotty record when it came to resisting. 

The most poignant article I read this week came from a writer in the Seventh Day Adventist tradition, one of the smallest Christian groups.  It was a very small group in Germany.  The author, Harold Alomia, wrote, “It seemed that the church found itself being pulled from three different directions: the desire to carry out its mission, the need to please the state and avoid its demise, and the wish to keep its organizational structure intact.”  (Harold Alomia, “Fatal Flirting: the Nazi State and the Seventh Day Adventist Church.” Journal of Adventist Mission Studies, Vol. 6 [2010], No. 1, Art. 2, p. 11.) (https://digitalcommons.andrews.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1042&context=jams). He added, “The church seemed eager to seek power from the state to carry out the proclamation that God has entrusted to the church.”  Let me repeat that: the church seemed eager to seek power from the state to carry out the proclamation that God has entrusted to the church.

Those statements apply to much of the church in that era.  Seeking power and protection, trying to preserve its life, particularly its institutional life, the church made deals that seemed to be to its advantage, but turning a blind eye to evil.  And so the church ended up worshiping something other than Jesus Christ.   Deals with the devil.

On Jesus’ way to his own promised land, the devil offered Jesus deal or no deal.  “No deal, Jesus answered.  “Scripture says that humanity cannot live on bread alone, but must feed on every word that comes from the mouth of God.  No deal!  Scripture says, ‘Do not put the Lord your God to the test.  No manipulating God!  No forcing God’s hand!  No deal!  Scripture says worship only God, and serve only God.”

As far as Jesus was concerned, no matter how hungry and impatient and eager for success one is, the will and way of God comes first!  There are no shortcuts to the Promised Land.  The humble, difficult way is the way.  The way of the cross is the way.  Some things are more important than protecting and saving ourselves.  Some things are more important than winning.

Christians are as tempted to make deals with the devil as ever.  As the Seventh Day Adventist writer put it, the church is still sometimes eager to seek power from the state to carry out the proclamation that God has entrusted to the church.  The church sometimes seeks the power of the state to fulfill its mission and meet its goals.  But when we unconditionally support someone who promises to deliver the power of the state to us through laws or directives, or in the form of seats on the Supreme Court, we are in grave danger of making deals with the devil.  And this will not end well.  Just ask our Israelite ancestors.  Just ask our Christian forebears who made that mistake.

The primary question for the Israelites, for Christ Jesus himself, and for Christ’s people today is not what is the most expedient, efficient, quickest way to make it to the promised land.  The question is not how can we MAKE what we want happen, INSURE it happens, however good it might be.  The question is not which way involves the least fear and the least pain, or what will please people and make us look good in others’ eyes, or draw crowds.  The primary question is “What is the will of God?”  We must think it through, guided by scripture just as Jesus did.  We must wrestle with it. We must discern it.

As we find our way into an uncertain future individually and together as congregations, as communities, and as a nation,  seemingly easier but dubious, devilish ways will suggest themselves as means to the ends we hope for.  What will it be?  Deal or no deal?

AMEN.

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'the temptation' photo (c) 2008, Harold Heindell Tejada - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/Here is a sermon from my archives for the first Sunday in Lent, Year C:

An Opportune Time
A Sermon on Genesis 3 and Luke 4:1-13

I used to think that my struggles would be over once I grew up.  Or at least things would be easier.  I thought grownups had all the answers, or at least knew where to find the answers. They knew where they were going. They knew what to do.  They could proceed into the future with confidence.

Well, I grew up, and I found out that grownups don’t have it so simple, and very few answers do come easily.  Grownups often have to struggle to find the way.  Sometimes they stumble towards the future.  It is tempting to seek out somebody who does seem to have their act together and then try to do what they do.

If that’s the way it is for human beings, why are we so surprised to see Jesus searching for the way?  If Jesus came to be one of us, if he truly was human, then how could he be exempt from the human struggle?  Yes, Jesus had known from childhood that he was put here to be about God’s business.  That’s what he told Mary and Joseph when he was twelve years old, when he stayed behind in the Temple in Jerusalem, discussing the scriptures with the elders.  Remember?  He knew it, yet he still struggled.

In our lesson today, Jesus was now around thirty, well into middle age measured by the average lifespan of that day.  He was middle-aged and he still hadn’t launched his public ministry.  What was going on?  Why all this waiting?  After Jesus was baptized, instead of handing Jesus a detailed agenda and itinerary and sending him off to work, God sent him off by himself.  The Holy Spirit led Jesus into the wilderness for a marathon of fasting and prayer.   He was still facing the questions of when, where and who and how.  Jesus knew what God was aiming at: salvation for all humanity.  Healing.  Release.  New life.  But how?  How to go about it?

The devil saw a golden opportunity.  This was an opportune time if there ever was one.  Why?  Jesus was needy.  Jesus was hungry, and tired, and asking hard questions.  Jesus was also eager to accomplish something good.  Open to suggestion?  Quite possibly.

Three times the devil’s voice broke in on Jesus.  First it said, “Since you are the Son of God, use your power and turn this stone into a loaf of bread.  Eat.”  Notice how sensible, how practical the devil’s suggestion was.  He’s not telling Jesus to go do something immoral.  Jesus needed to eat.  There were rocks all around, lots of them.  He had the power.  Here was a simple way to solve this problem.  And think of all the other hungry people he could feed!  The supply of rocks was unlimited!

Then the devil said, “Look at all the kingdoms of the earth.  Here, look!  I can give them to you.  I know how they work.  I control them.  Make a deal with me, worship me, and they’re yours.”  Again, practical.  Power gets things done in this world.  Money talks.  This is the tried and true.  Think of all you can accomplish with these resources at your command.  You can make things happen, Jesus!  The good end justifies the means.

And then the devil quoted scripture, saying, “Put Psalm 91 into action, where it says that the angels will catch you, so you won’t even stub your toe.  Jump off the Temple and prove it.”  True, it is in the scripture.  “Here is a way to force the people to admit that you really are who you say you are, Jesus.  They’ll have to listen to you.  You’ll have the Temple authorities right where you want them.”

The devil gave Jesus a whole list of ways to take the bull by the horns and seize success.  Jesus, this works!  Take my advice and great things will happen!

But if Jesus says “yes” here’s what else will happen:  (more…)

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